The US Coast Guard issued a Safety Alert stating that it has withdrawn the Certificate of Approval for NAMMO LIAB AB Orange Smoke Hand Distress Signal, alternately labeled as Polar MK 4 by NAMMO LIAB AB or as IKAROS by Hansson Pyrotech. This action was taken because the chemical makeup of the signal was changed in October 2013 without Coast Guard approval and the signal as subsequently manufactured is at risk of spontaneous combustion if dropped. Safety Alert 04-16

The US Coast Guard issued a notice announcing availability of NVIC 02-16 – Inspection Guidance for Sail Rigging and Masts on Inspected Sailing Vessels. 81 Fed. Reg. 23001

Here is the document, for your reading pleasure (PDF)

From the Coast Guard, here is a link to a summary of changes to regulations, policy letters and safety alerts for passenger vessels.

Summary of changes 2016 (PDF)

Via Bryants Maritime Blog

The USCG National Maritime Center (NMC) issued a notice announcing revisions to the Merchant Mariner Credential (MMC) booklet. All currently active credentials will remain valid until their printed expiration dates. located at http://www.uscg.mil/nmc/announcements/pdfs/new_mmc_announcement.pdf

 

Via Coast Guard News

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Coast Guard published guidance Feb. 5 that allows mariners to use electronic charts and publications instead of paper charts, maps and publications.

The Navigation and Vessel Inspection Circular, NVIC 01-16 establishes uniform guidance on what is now considered equivalent to chart and publication carriage requirements.

Combining the suite of electronic charts from the U.S. hydrographic authorities and the Electronic Charting System (ECS) standards published this past summer by the Radio Technical Commission for Maritime Services, the Coast Guard believes official electronic charts provide mariners with a substitute for the traditional official paper charts.

Click here to continue reading the article

As of October 1, 2015, the United States Coast Guard has implemented the use of the new CG-719 series of forms (B, C, K, K/E, P, and S) that will replace the forms displaying a June 30, 2012, expiration date.

The Coast Guard will not stock the CG-719 series of forms in paper format. These forms may be obtained electronically in a PDF fillable format on the National Maritime Center (NMC) website. Additional updates to the NMC website will occur as quickly as possible to reflect the new forms.

The Coast Guard encourages providers and applicants to purge the old forms from inventory and to begin using the new forms as soon as possible. In order to avoid penalizing mariners who have already completed their forms, the NMC will continue to accept the old forms for a period of time.

With the exception of forms K and K/E, the Coast Guard will no longer accept outdated CG-719 forms after April 1, 2016. For the K and K/E, forms signed by a physician after December 31, 2015, must be the new form version. In accordance with 46CFR10.304(d), the K or K/E must be submitted within 12 months of the date signed by a licensed medical professional, therefore, the Coast Guard will no longer accept outdated K or K/E forms after December 31, 2016.

Here is the entire announcement from the National Maritime Center

Maritime Commons attended an open house hosted by the Coast Guard’s National Maritime Center to provide updates on the credentialing process, future credentialing policies and their impacts on mariners and industry.

The National Maritime Center’s Commanding Officer, Capt. Jeffrey Novotny, provided opening remarks and updates on the NMC’s operations and initiatives.

For those of you who were unable to attend, Maritime Commons is providing a condensed version of Novotny’s remarks in a four-part series. These remarks are not ‘as delivered’ but provide a condensed version of the highlights for your informational purposes…

Delivered by Capt. Jeffrey Novotny, Coast Guard National Maritime Center commanding officer:

We are here to serve and assist the mariner in getting credentials. Our goal is to do this as efficient and effectively as possible.

The Coast Guard’s credentialing program is a three-legged stool:

The Office of Operating and Environmental Standards, Maritime Personnel Qualifications Division creates the regulations

The Office of Commercial Vessel Compliance, Mariner Credentialing Program Policy Division works with regulations to create policy

The National Maritime Center implements the regulation and policy

These program elements meet regularly because there’s nothing worse than a program that isn’t aligned. (more…)

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