USCG – change to Inland Navigation Rules
The USCG National Maritime Center (NMC) issued a notice reminding mariners of a recent change to the Inland Navigation Rules. The word ‘danger’ has been removed from Rule 34, aligning it with the 1972 COLREGS and alleviating potential ambiguity. (6/21/18)

Click here for the full press release. 

USCG – the role of SMSs
The US Coast Guard issued a bulletin discussing the role of safety management systems (SMSs). (6/21/18)

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This safety alert raises awareness of a potentially dangerous circumstance involving Personal Flotation Devices (PFDs). During several inspections involving different vessels, Coast Guard personnel discovered a significant number (>100) of unwearable type 1 PFDs that would have presented a problem for users if needed in an emergency. Owners and operators are reminded that regulations require PFDs onboard vessels to be wearable and in serviceable condition.

Click here to continue reading the press release (PDF)

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On March 31, 2018, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) approved the new CG-719 series of forms which will replace all previous versions.

These new forms may be obtained electronically in a PDF fillable format at the Coast Guard’s National Maritime Center (NMC) website https://www.uscg.mil/nmc. The Coast Guard will not stock the CG-719 series of forms in paper format.

Click here to continue reading the release (PDF) >>>

From the United States Coast Guard: As a reminder, the amendments to the regulations in 46 CFR Part 4 for Marine Casualty Reporting Property Damage Thresholds published in the Final Rule March 19, 2018, became effective on April 18, 2018.

As a result:
• The property damage threshold for a marine casualty that requires immediate notice under 46 CFR 4.05-1 and the written report under 46 CFR 4.05-10 is now $75,000.
• The property damage threshold for an incident to be classified as a serious marine incident (SMI) as defined in 46 CFR 4.03-2 is now $200,000.
• In addition, technical amendments were made to update various references to the CG-2692 form and its appendixes throughout 46 CFR Part 4.

Continue reading via Coast Guard Maritime Commons >>>

Via Coast Guard Maritime Commons

Coast Guard Form CG-835, Vessel/Facility Inspection Requirements, has been used to document deficiencies on Coast Guard inspected vessels and facilities. Recently, the Coast Guard completed development of a new form, CG-835V: Vessel Inspection Requirements, which was specifically tailored to capture more detailed deficiency data in a manner that is aligned with globally accepted Port State Control methodologies. The CG-835V was developed in conjunction with corresponding enhancements to the Coast Guard’s internal database, MISLE, in order to support better data analytics and the development and monitoring of Key Performance Indicators for the U.S. flag fleet and the Recognized Organizations (ROs) that perform statutory certification and services on the Coast Guard’s behalf.

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Via Workboat.com

Coast Guard raises marine casualty report threshold to $75,000

The Coast Guard has raised the limit on damages that trigger a marine casualty report to keep pace with inflation, and eliminate the burden of chronicling and investigating relatively minor mishaps.

The new property damage threshold is $75,000, up from $25,000 and $3,000 higher than originally proposed. The limit for a serious marine incident, which requires mandatory drug and alcohol testing, is $200,000, up from $100,000 but still lower than many industry advocates sought.

The final rule published Monday – the first change since the amounts were established in the 1980s – is effective April 18.

“This is a big step forward. We welcome these improved thresholds,” said John Groundwater, executive director of the Passenger Vessel Association (PVA). “We would have liked to see higher numbers, but we’re generally pleased. It will be helpful.”

The American Waterways Operators (AWO) also supported the increase.

Continue reading this article at Workboat.com >>>

From United States Coast Guard Headquarters
Inspections and Compliance Directorate

During a recent inspection, U.S. Coast Guard Port State Control examiners discovered a significant flaw involving almost all of a vessel’s immersion suits. The examiners noted that the glue used to attach the main zipper to the body of the suit had failed. Failure of the suit at this location will prevent the suit from achieving a watertight seal. Such conditions present serious risk to crewmembers in a survival situation.

Due to the high failure rate discovered during the Coast Guard exam (35 out of 40 suits were defective), the Coast Guard strongly recommends that vessel operators inspect their Immersion Suits for this potential unsafe condition. Do not wait to discover the problem during a real emergency. As a reminder, any replacement survival suits need to be approved by the vessel’s Flag State.

Distributed by the Office of Investigations and Casualty Analysis, Washington DC. Questions may be sent to HQS-PF-fldr-CG-INV@uscg.mil.

Click here for images of defective suits (PDF)