United States Coast Guard


USCG

From the United States Coast Guard:

Navigation lights intended for use on power driven vessels may be different from navigation lights intended for use on sailing vessels. Although the horizontal arc of visibility is the same for all lights, the vertical divergence requirements for lights on vessels under sail are larger to accommodate greater heeling.  Manufacturer labeling may not discriminate between the different requirements. Navigation lights that claim compliance with the navigation rules may meet the vertical stability requirements for a power driven vessel, however, they may not comply with the vertical visibility standards for sailing vessels.

Click here to continue reading the Marine Safety Alert (PDF)>>>

Pack your snacks, Sector Southeastern New England’s Passenger Vessel Industry Day will be held March 29, 2019, 0800-1200 at –
UMASS Advanced Technology & Manufacturing Center
151 Martine Street, Fall River, MA  02723
508.910.9800

*Please be sure to park in the lot across the street* (more…)

Via Coast Guard Maritime Commons:

 

For the convenience of our readers, Maritime Commons will occasionally announce when the Marine Safety Center (MSC) publishes updated Plan Review Guidelines and Design Verification Guidelines.

The following Plan Review Guidelines were updated in October 2018:

GEN 05 – “Stability Test Procedures

This Plan Review Guideline provides general guidance and information for conducting successful stability tests and submitting stability test procedures to the MSC. It applies to vessels certificated under any subchapter of 46 CFR.

Plan Review Guidelines were developed by MSC staff and are provided as an aid in the preparation and review of vessel plans and submissions. They were developed to supplement existing guidance and are not intended to substitute or replace laws, regulations, or other official Coast Guard policy documents. For more information about PRG, contact the MSC at msc@uscg.mil or 202-795-6729. When contacting MSC, reference the PRG by procedure number, e.g. GEN 05.

Via The Practical Sailor

Coast Guard Warns of Radio Interference from LEDs

Back in 2010, Practical Sailor and others raised the alert that a conversion to LED navigation lights can have some unintended consequences, including distorted color shifts (see PS January 2016 “USCG Issues Alert on Uncertified Nav Lights” and PS October 2017  “Converting an Anchor Light to a Tricolor Light” ). And we’ve long been concerned about LED lights, both interior and exterior, interfering with VHF and AIS radio transmissions (see PS February 2010 “Practical Sailor Tracks Down the Best LED Tri-color Light” see PS June 2014, “LED Interior Lights Part 2”).

The problem with radio interference has recently gotten the attention of the U.S. Coast Guard, which released the following Marine Safety Alert on August 15, 2018.

“The U.S. Coast Guard has received reports from crews, ship owners, inspectors and other mariners regarding poor reception on VHF frequencies used for radiotelephone, digital selective calling (DSC) and automatic identification systems (AIS) when in the vicinity of light emitting diode (LED) lighting on-board ships (e.g., navigation lights, searchlights and floodlights, interior and exterior lights, adornment).

– Continue reading the article on the Practical Sailor website –

 

USCG – change to Inland Navigation Rules
The USCG National Maritime Center (NMC) issued a notice reminding mariners of a recent change to the Inland Navigation Rules. The word ‘danger’ has been removed from Rule 34, aligning it with the 1972 COLREGS and alleviating potential ambiguity. (6/21/18)

Click here for the full press release. 

USCG – the role of SMSs
The US Coast Guard issued a bulletin discussing the role of safety management systems (SMSs). (6/21/18)

Click here for more information.

untitled

On March 31, 2018, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) approved the new CG-719 series of forms which will replace all previous versions.

These new forms may be obtained electronically in a PDF fillable format at the Coast Guard’s National Maritime Center (NMC) website https://www.uscg.mil/nmc. The Coast Guard will not stock the CG-719 series of forms in paper format.

Click here to continue reading the release (PDF) >>>

From the United States Coast Guard: As a reminder, the amendments to the regulations in 46 CFR Part 4 for Marine Casualty Reporting Property Damage Thresholds published in the Final Rule March 19, 2018, became effective on April 18, 2018.

As a result:
• The property damage threshold for a marine casualty that requires immediate notice under 46 CFR 4.05-1 and the written report under 46 CFR 4.05-10 is now $75,000.
• The property damage threshold for an incident to be classified as a serious marine incident (SMI) as defined in 46 CFR 4.03-2 is now $200,000.
• In addition, technical amendments were made to update various references to the CG-2692 form and its appendixes throughout 46 CFR Part 4.

Continue reading via Coast Guard Maritime Commons >>>

Next Page »